Homework When it is Just Too Much!


Homework When it is Just Too Much!

Introduction

Homework can be a source of stress for parents, students, and teachers. But it doesn't have to be! Here are some strategies for managing homework, so it doesn't cause added stress or anxiety in your family.

Homework can be a huge source of stress for parents.

Homework can be a huge source of stress for parents. It's frustrating to see your child struggle with hours of homework, causing tension and overwhelming feelings.

As a parent, you want your children to succeed in school and have fun learning new things. But when they're tired after a long day at school, doing homework can feel like an extra burden on top of everything else they have going on--especially if they don't understand the material or can't find the words to explain their answers adequately!

Helping a weary child with hours of homework is frustrating for everyone involved: the student who feels defeated by their inability to complete the assignment, the parent who wants nothing more than for their kid not only finish but also learn something from what was done; even teachers get frustrated when students aren't able to do work that should be easy for them (and thus waste valuable class time).

Homework has a plus side.

Teaching our children to manage their time is also essential. We must teach them how to prioritize, manage their emotions, and manage their behavior.

When a child does not have the skills needed for self-regulation, it can lead to stress and anxiety in school or at home. This can cause problems in the classroom as well as at home because the frustration they feel when they don't understand something is real, and often goes unaddressed!

By teaching our children tools for time management, using checklists, if/then motivators, calendars, timers, and honestly, the ability to say, that is enough we can teach them to be more productive adults.

When a child has special needs or is struggling in school, it can be especially difficult for the student and parent.

When a child has special needs or is struggling in school, it can be especially difficult for the student and parent.

Children with disabilities often have difficulty with homework due to their disability. This can be true even if they are doing well academically.

For example, suppose your child has dyslexia and struggles with reading comprehension. In that case, he may find it hard to complete his assignments at home because he needs help understanding what he is reading or how it relates to what he is learning in school. If this frequently happens, it could lead him down a path toward developing negative attitudes toward schoolwork as well as his teacher(s).

Telling a child if you don't get it done at school, the work will become homework is not helpful. When this happens, the school is now making YOU the accommodation for your child rather than following through with the support outlined in the IEP.

There are many reasons why sending work home that should have been completed in class might be too much.

When your child comes home with homework that he hasn't completed in class, you might have to scramble to help him finish it by dinner time. This causes a lot of anxiety for both the student and the parent because it means that everyone involved has an unfinished project hanging over their heads at the end of each day.

Homework often leads to high anxiety levels for students who get anxious about having to do it at all (or even just thinking about doing it). Suppose these students are given excessive amounts of homework every night after school. In that case, this added pressure may cause tension at home which will run into their life at school as well!

Additionally, often times when a child has special needs they have after school therapies, counseling, social support. Our kids have a mountain of activities to attend just to have the skills their peers come by naturally. Adding excessive homework because it was not completed at school simply adds fuel to the fire.

There are many ways to help manage homework so that it does not cause added stress or anxiety.

There are many ways to help manage homework so that it does not cause added stress or anxiety.

  • Make sure homework is at the child's skill level. If your child struggles with reading, for example, they may be assigned a book report on a novel they can't read yet; this will only make them feel frustrated and defeated. Insist the school accommodates this novel and possibly talk to the teacher to request another way for your child to demonstrate what they have learned (perhaps by creating an oral presentation or video).
  • Make sure homework is relevant to what they are learning in school: Homework should reinforce what was taught during class time and provide practice with concepts covered in class but might need further review before being mastered by students.
  • Create checklist of things that need to be accomplished.
  • Have a calendar for bigger projects and block out dates when you will work on those.
  • Set a timer: agree to how long the child will spend on homework, and when they are done, they are done. If they spend a lot of time on a subject because they are stuck, move on.
  • Keep track of what gets done, what does not, how long you worked on assignments, and how much support your child received.

Conclusion

I am not saying that homework should be banned. I am simply saying it can be too much for some kids and parents. If you feel like your child is struggling with their homework or classroom work, then you should speak up! There are many ways to help manage homework so that it does not cause added stress or anxiety.